Author Archives: Stephen Wellings

About Stephen Wellings

I am a publishing and training professional with over 30 years' editorial and senior management experience in companies such as McGraw-Hill, Pan Books, International Thomson, The Open College, Butterworth-Heinemann and Pergamon Open Learning. During my career I have commissioned and published hundreds of books and learning materials in science, technology, social science, business and management. I have designed, developed and published major distance learning programmes, including one of the world’s largest for ACCA, the professional accounting body. I am accomplished at delivering sizeable publishing and training projects on time, within budget and to exacting quality standards. In my spare time I promote live modern jazz in the Thames Valley, under the Jazz in Reading brand. I am also Co-chair of Reading Borough Council's Learning Disabilities Partnership Board.

Proofreading 8: Further reading and resources

This is our final blog on proofreading for non-professionals. In it, we point the way to some other resources on proofreading which you might find helpful. The resources are not exclusively on proofreading, since there is overlap with other topics, … Continue reading

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The fewer the words, the greater the clarity

But it’s often much harder to write briefly than it is at length. As Blaise Pascal famously wrote in 1657: ‘I have made this letter longer than usual, only because I have not had time to make it shorter.’ This … Continue reading

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Proofreading 7: Common errors to watch out for

This is the penultimate blog in our eight-part series on proofreading for non-professionals. The final blog will offer some suggestions for further reading, training or information on proofreading. In the meantime, here’s a brief list of some very common errors … Continue reading

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Do you have a sesquipedalian writing style?

If so, you are prone to confusing people, and generally not impressing them, by using long words — like ‘sesquipedalian’ possibly**. When we use long and unfamiliar words it affects the readability of our writing. Long words tend to have … Continue reading

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Proofreading 6: Using proof correction marks

Most people who do occasional proofreading tasks will not want to spend their valuable time learning how to use professional proof correction marks. And quite possibly the people who need to understand or act on the corrections won’t know what … Continue reading

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Proofreading 5: Getting down to it

Now that all your preparation is done, you can start the actual proofreading. This is the fifth in our series of proofreading tips. The series is aimed at people whose job title doesn’t include the word ‘proofreader’, but who nevertheless … Continue reading

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Long sentences, with no time off for good behaviour

The words are tumbling out beautifully for you. You are proud of that well-constructed, elegant and impressively long sentence. It’s sometimes even easier to write a long sentence than a short one. But if you want to be understood, beware: … Continue reading

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